For the latest information and guidance on the Service Charity Sector and the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, please click here

Unpaid carers in the Armed Forces community – we want to hear from you

Tell us how we can make your experience as a carer better

The Royal British Legion and Poppyscotland would like to better understand what it’s like to be an unpaid carer in the UK Armed Forces community. Whether you’re in the Serving or the ex-Service community, we want to hear from you.

Tell us your experiences of being a carer and the impact it has on your life. Do you need better support? If so, what do you need?

Our research has shown that members of the ex-Service community are almost twice as likely to have a caring responsibility for a family member, friend or neighbour when
compared to the adult population of England and Wales (23% v 12%). That’s almost 990,000 people.

Give us your views

We’ve put together a brief survey which should take no more than 10 minutes to complete. This survey closes on Monday 5 April.

Take part here.

Your views and experiences will help shape our policy and campaigning work, and how we improve the support you receive. We take your privacy seriously – your answers will be used anonymously as part of a research report.

If you’d like the survey in a different format, have any further questions, or would like to tell us more about your experiences please email us on publicaffairs@britishlegion.org.uk.

If you would like to find out more about RBL or Poppyscotland or need support with your caring responsibilities, please visit our websites at https://www.britishlegion.org.uk/ or
https://www.poppyscotland.org.uk

Our Executive Members

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The Service Charity Sector and the coronavirus outbreak

For the latest information and guidance on the Service Charity Sector and the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, please click here